My other TBR pile

After college I remember thinking I’d never want to read anything but fiction again for the rest of my life. I probably had the same thought after grad school. But then I immediately picked up The Toyota Way because I actually like this stuff and I thought it might apply to my new job.

Nowadays, I read a lot of romance and the occasional thriller or mystery, but I still read a fair amount of nonfiction. Aside from books on writing, I read for background research, to learn something new, or just on a topic of interest.

Here are a few of the nonfiction books sitting on my—virtual or actual—shelf waiting anxiously for me to get caught up. *snort* Like that will happen.

  • Rogue Warrior by Richard Marcinko
  • The Kind Diet by Alicia Silverstone
  • Band of Sisters: American Women at War in Iraq by Kristen Holmstedt
  • Story by Robert McKee
  • The Art of Intrusion: The Real Stories Behind the Exploits of Hackers, Intruders and Deceivers by Kevin D. Mitnick
  • Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq by Steve Call
  • Bad And Beautiful: Inside the Dazzling and Deadly World of Supermodels by Ian Halperin
  • SuperFreakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

I could actually go on and on—I have a whole list of books I haven’t even acquired yet sitting on my Evernote app—but I’ll spare you. 😉

What’s on your nonfiction TBR? Or do you stick strictly to fiction?

Photo credit: BOOKS © Mykola Velychko | Dreamstime.com

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11 Responses

  1. I really enjoyed the Malcolm Gladwell books – The Tipping Point and The Outliers. Thought there were some revolutionary ideas in there regarding how we form who we are. Still pull if off the shelf every now and then.

    I picked up a book called Louisiana Rambles by Ian McNulty for some research for the books I wrote this year. Really enjoyed this travel book that was so not boring like most travel books. He’s a gifted storytelller.

    That may be all the non-fiction I read other that a craft book or two. I don’t tend to like non-fiction all that much, but if it’s amusing or entertaining or engrossing, I can be convinced.

  2. Mostly I read fiction. I confess that I read a nonfiction written by a female dom for research. Interesting reading! When I was growing up, I read anything I could get my hands on. I read lots of nonfiction like The Autobiography of Malcolm X, The Autobiography of George Washington Carver, Joan of Arc, etc. Now days I don’t read much other than fiction.

    I wish I could say I read a lot of craft books but I don’t. I HAVE a shelf full of craft books but I rarely touch them.

    • Cyndi: My fiction to nonfic ratio is really, really high. Sometimes I like a good NF because I can read it slowly. That is, I can actually set it down and go to bed. 😉 I’ll take a month or more to work through something like that, all the while fitting in a couple of romances a week.

      I went through a biography/autobiography phase a few years ago: Lincoln, Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Charles Lindbergh, and Carnegie. I also used to listen to a lot of motivational books and seminars when I had a commute to work.

      If something doesn’t catch or keep my interest (NF or fiction) I won’t read it, though. Life’s too short to read things just because I think I should, and not because I want to.

  3. So many books, so little time. LOL I’m a sucker for organization books. Not that one I’ve read has helped all that much. But I keep buying them, hoping one will stick out from the pack and change me overnight. 🙂

    And then there are all those craft books. I make it to the middle of most of them. But I rarely get the chance to back to finish them.

    • I know what you mean, Melissa. Reading could be a full-time job for me. I love to know stuff, but don’t always want to take the time to get it into my brain.

      Good luck getting organized!

  4. I have an odd mental block about nonfiction, even stuff I KNOW I’ll like or even love. I just can’t read it. No idea why. I got Tina Fey’s book and Chelsea Handler’s book out of the library—they sat until they were due. After having access to Save the Cat for six months or something, I finally started to read it last week. Got through two chapters, put it down, and never picked it up again.

    Some nonfiction is gloriously written, and there’s so much out there that I know would be fascinating—and I just can’t force myself to do it. Pretty good indicator I should never go to graduate school, huh? LOL

    • Natalie: The beauty is that you don’t have to read it unless you want to! And of course the grad school thing all depends on your degree. The older I get the longer it takes me to get through a lot of those nonfiction books, and if I don’t, I figure it wasn’t my highest priority. 🙂

  5. hmm. I think all my nonfiction stuff is research. Dummy books and historical research books. I can barely read my TBR fiction stuff!

    • I love the For Dummies books, Keri. They’re so much more in depth than people think. I know what you mean about keeping up. Both of my TBR piles are metaphorically teetering.

  6. I don’t read it often and when I do, it’s usually as research for a WIP. I don’t have a TBR list though. It’s kinda as needed.

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